LECTURES ARCHIVE

18 JANUARY 2017
ISLAM AND THE MOSQUE

The development and spread of Islam following the death of the prophet Mohamed led to the adoption of one particular building type for all Muslims, the Mosque. The lecture begins with the life of the Prophet and the astonishing spread of Islam after his death. The early Islamic monuments of Jerusalem and Damascus will be examined, as well as the spread to North Africa from where the religion spread to Spain and the building of the great mosque at Cordoba.
DR. TOM DUNCAN
Tom Duncan studied History of Art and Ancient History and Classical Archaeology at Trinity College, Dublin. He has lectured at university level and to many heritage and arts organisations.


15 FEBRUARY 2017
HOGARTH – A HARLOT, A RAKE, AND A MARRIAGE
William Hogarth (1697-1764) aspired to be a great society painter of his age. However, his sense of humour and social conscience threw this off course. He succeeded in becoming a great British printmaker, using prints “to reform the reigning vices” of his age. Here, Hilary Williams, who lectures for The British Museum and the Wallace Collection, will look at his series of compositions: the Harlot’s Progress; the Rake’s Progress; and the Marriage-à-la-Mode, with their related drawings, prints, and paintings, to see how Hogarth developed his themes and reflected the luxury and poverty of Georgian Britain.
HILARY WILLIAMS
Formerly Print Room Superintendent at the British Museum, now Art History Education Officer. Lectures for BM, London Borough of Bexley and Wallace Collection. NADFAS liaison officer at British Museum. Founding Artistic Director North Kent Evening DFAS. Guides Special Interest Private Tours of State Apartments Buckingham Palace.


15 MARCH 2017
OPERA, THE MELTING POT OF CULTURE
The talk charts opera’s close connection with the society that is paying for it. The talk moves from the 17th and 18th century preoccupations with princely patronage, classical plots, courtly manners, high voices, enormous costumes and happy endings – through the gear change of the war and revolution to the 19th century concerns of nationalism, epic themes and doomed heroines.  The talk is based on years of writing articles, programme notes, and lecturing for the Royal Opera House and the BBC.


19 APRIL 2017

GRAYSON PERRY, FROCKS AND POTS

Widely known for his appearances dressed as his feminine alter ego, Claire, Grayson Perry RA is now a core part of the art establishment. Ten years after winning the Turner Prize he gave the brilliant BBC Reith Lecture in 2013. His works of ceramics, textiles, tapestries and prints are highly sought after. Often controversial, he is able to tackle difficult subjects in a poignant yet witty way. This talk will examine Grayson Perry’s works, his exciting and thought provoking exhibitions, and we’ll look at the character inside the flamboyant frocks.

IAN SWANKIE

A Londoner with a passion for art and architecture. He is an official guide at Tate Modern, Tate Britain, Guildhall Art Gallery and St Paul’s Cathedral, and gives regular tours at each venue. Also a qualified and active freelance London guide and a member of both the City of London and Westminster Guide Lecturer Associations. Clients include NADFAS and WEA groups, Transport for London, the National Trust and London Open House. In 2012 he established a weekly independent art lecture group in Richmond and gives talks on a variety of subjects.


17 MAY 2017
FABER AND FABER – ITS DESIGNS AND HISTORY

TONY FABER

Has written two works of narrative history, Stradivarius and Fabergé’s Eggs, published by Macmillan in the UK and Random House in the US, and given lectures associated with these two subjects at venues including The Victoria and Albert Museum, Bath Theatre, The Library of Congress and the Huntington Library, as well as a number of literary festivals. His career began with Natural Sciences at Cambridge and has been through investment banking, management consulting and five years as managing director of the publishing company founded by his grandfather, Faber and Faber, where he remains on the board. Is also non-executive Chairman of its sister company, Faber Music, a trustee of Yale University Press (UK) and a director of the Authors Licensing and Collecting Society.

Since its foundation in 1925, Faber and Faber has built a reputation as one of London’s most important literary publishing houses. Part of that relates to the editorial team that Geoffrey Faber and his successors built around them – TS Eliot was famously an early recruit – but a large part is also due to the firm’s insistence on good design and illustration. This lecture traces the history of Faber and Faber through its illustrations, covers and designs. Early years brought innovations like the Ariel Poems – single poems, beautifully illustrated, sold in their own envelopes. In the 1950s and 1960s, there was an emphasis on typography, led by the firm’s art director Berthold Wolpe; his Albertus font is still used on City of London road signs. In the 1980s, the firm started its association with Pentagram, responsible for the ff logo. Along the way, it has employed some of our most celebrated artists as cover illustrators – from Rex Whistler and Barnett Freedman to Peter Blake and Damien Hirst. Slides will range from book covers, advertisements and photos of key individuals, to illustrations of the concepts behind the designs. The talk will also be peppered with personal insight and anecdote. Faber and Faber is the last of the great publishing houses to remain independent. As the grandson of its founder, I grew up steeped in its books. I was managing director for four years and I remain on the board. I am passionate about the firm’s success, and intensely proud of my association with it.


21 JUNE 2017
THE ART AND SCANDALOUS LIVES OF THE BLOOMSBURY GROUP

The art of the three main ‘Bloomsbury’ artists (Duncan Grant, Vanessa Bell and Roger Fry) cannot be separated from their extraordinary lives. They, along with their literary and other intellectual companions (Virginia Woolf, Lytton Strachey and John Maynard Keynes, amongst others) were part of a movement, the popular name for which became widely used only after the death of around half its members.

FRANK WOODGATE

Lecturer and Guide at Tate Britain and Tate Modern, and for Tate on cruises. Lecturer at Dulwich Picture Gallery and scriptwriter for the Living Paintings Trust (art for the blind and partially-sighted). Lecturer can provide digital projector if required.


20 SEPTEMBER 2017

WHEN BRITAIN CLICKED – FAB PHOTOS FROM THE SWINGING SIXTIES

British photography enjoyed a golden age in the 1960s. Young, talented  newcomers broke out of the conventional studio to revolutionise perceptions of fashion, portraiture and popular culture. This lecture looks at a range of  superb images from photographers such as David Bailey, Terence Donovan,  Lewis Morley, Tony Ray­Jones and Jane Bown.

BRIAN STATER

His chief interests lie in photography, architecture and history and he combines all three in his lecturing career. He has taught at University College London, since 1997 and became a NADFAS lecturer in 2003. He is a member of the Association for Historical and Fine Art Photography and an exhibition of his own photographs has been staged at UCL. In an attempt to gain a deeper understanding of the skills of some great photographers of the past, he has begun to work with a pre-War Leica camera, as used by his great hero, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and many others.

18 OCTOBER 2017

CHANGE OF LECTURE: THE GARDENER IN ART

Our scheduled lecture for 18 October, Professor Roy Burden, Plants and Birds in Art – from the Ice Age to the Digital Age, has had to be cancelled owing to illness.

We were, however, very fortunate in being able to book, at short notice, what promises to be an equally exciting talk by Dr Patricia Andrew.

Dr PATRICIA ANDREW

Dr Andrew is a historian of both art and gardens, and a hands-on gardener. She finds that although gardens and their designers have been the subject of considerable art-historical study, the gardeners themselves have been somewhat neglected – so this lecture aims to redress the balance! She discusses why artists have chosen to feature gardeners in their compositions (and why they have sometimes excluded them), with images from medieval times to the present day. A number of celebrated artist-gardeners are also included, particularly from 19th-century France and 20th-century Britain.

Biography: Dr Patricia Andrew FSA FRSA AMA, is an art historian by academic training, with a doctorate from Edinburgh University. She ran galleries and museums in Sussex, Essex, and Durham, after which she returned to Edinburgh as Assistant Director of the Scottish Museums Council, the professional body for museums in Scotland. She is now a consultant, researcher and writer, and a lecturer for The Arts Society, the National Galleries of Scotland, and various other organisations including cruise lines; her recent book on 20th-century Scottish war art won the 2015 Saltire Society Scottish History Book of the Year award.


15 NOVEMBER 2017

UP TO A POINT – IN SEARCH OF PYRAMIDS IN BRITAIN AND IRELAND

From Inverness to Cornwall, from Pembrokeshire to Norfolk, from the Antrim Coast to County Cork, the pyramids of Britain and Ireland are little-known but of great variety and interest. This talk, which will include local examples, sets the pyramids of Britain and Ireland in their historical perspective and tells the story of the mausoleums, memorials, garden ornaments, pumps, wellheads, boat houses, beacons, sculptures, churches, offices, shops, sports halls, swimming pools, cinemas, navigation marks and general pyramidal oddities that turn up in the most unexpected places. Their builders range from eccentrics to engineers, via martyrs, philanthropists, ghosts, kings, musicians, heroes and villains. The talk uncovers forgotten corners of history and highlights unusual discoveries, like Britain’s only castiron pyramid, a Scottish Formica pyramid, an Irish pyramid that sheltered the IRA and a Welsh one made of road signs. Whether you have an interest in architecture, landscapes, gardening, Freemasonry, New Age ideas, scandalous family histories or just in what prompts people to place triangles together to make an interesting structure, Up to a Point will surprise and inspire you.

DAVID WINPENNY

Studied English at Birmingham University and taught for several years before joining the Countryside Commission as Co-ordinator of its National Parks Campaign. Worked for the Central Office of Information in Leeds before setting up own public relations company. Author of ‘Up to a Point – in search of pyramids in Britain and Ireland’ and has written and contributed to several books for the AA. Writes regularly for BBC Countryfile Magazine, is chairman of Ripon Civic Society and lectures on architectural and related subjects.


17 JANUARY 2018

THE LEGACY OF HENRY MOORE FOR CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS IN BRITAIN

This lecture looks at two dominant types of response to Moore and his work in Britain since 1945. Artists either made work about Moore, critically and conceptually appropriating aspects of his work, or they made new work through Moore, developing the formal language of sculpture and some of the values that Moore held dear. Artists of all persuasions in Britain have been making work either “about” or “through“ Moore’s work and some have subtle ways of combining and blending both.


THIS LECTURE WAS CANCELLED AND REPLACED WITH A TALK BY NICHOLAS MERCHANT ON FABERGÉ AT THE COURT OF THE TS


21 FEBRUARY 2018

EVERY STADIUM SHOULD HAVE AN ART GALLERY: THE HISTORY AND ROLE OF ART IN RELATION TO SPORT

The ancient Olympics featured the arts and the modern Olympics originally awarded gold medals for art as well as sport. Artists have been inspired by sport to express their interest in human movement, physicality and spectacle, while sport has used art to celebrate and promote its achievements. This illustrated presentation explores some of these links and the aesthetic and cultural relationships between art and sport.

DR DOUG SANDLE

Dr Doug Sandle, a chartered psychologist, is a retired researcher and academic and for many years taught artists, designers and architects the psychology of visual perception and aesthetics. Dr Sandle is the founder of Field of Vision, bringing together individuals from both art and sport to explore and promote the relationship between the two. Dr Sandle is also founder of and chaired an arts programme for Leeds Rugby and Leeds Rhinos Foundation.


21 MARCH 2018

SURREALISM IN BRITAIN: UNCANNY LANDSCAPES
French surrealists in the 1920’s and 1930’s looked for instances of the marvellous in the urban environment. Its British equivalent preferred to draw upon the natural world for motifs and source materials, in paintings, photography, sculptures and found objects . The irrational forces of nature at work in strange rock formations, in the shapes of
bones, shells and sea creatures and in plants and tree growth fascinated artists like Eileen Agar, Paul Nash, Edward Wadsworth and FE McWilliam. The surrealist concept of change found a focus in the British landscape: the accidental form encountered while walking in the country, or beach-combing at the coast. This lecture will explore the British Surrealists‘ interest in nature made strange and uncanny, as a source of wonder but also of anxiety: extraordinary but troubling.

DR JULIA KELLY

Dr Julia Kelly was educated at Oxford University and the Courtauld Institute in London. She has taught at the Universities of Manchester and Hull and is currently Research Associate at Loughborough University. She has published on surrealism , art and anthropology, modern and contemporary sculpture and the history of museums and galleries.


18 APRIL 2018

READING SHAKESPEARE, HOT OFF THE PRESS
What was it like to read a newly published play by Shakespeare? This talk discusses Shakespeare in print during his lifetime, asking whether Shakespeare was really as popular as we assume, and identifying his role in the development of drama as something to read as well as, or even instead of, something to see. It will be illustrated with pages from early editions of the plays, from the earliest, Titus Andronicus in 1594, to the collected editions now known as the First Folio and published posthumously in 1623.

DR EMMA SMITH

Emma Smith was born and educated in Leeds and now teaches Shakespeare and early modern literature at the University of Oxford. Her most recent book is Shakespeare’s First Folio: Four Centuries of an Iconic Book, Oxford University Press 2016.


16 MAY 2018

THE GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY LECTURE
ELEPHANTS AND ARCHBISHOPS

Bestiaries are the famous medieval illustrated encyclopaedias of all the animals of the world, from the familar to the exotic and fantastic. The lecture will be richly illustrated with pictures from very many illuminated manuscript Bestiaries. It will look at some of the extraordinary medieval beliefs and stories about animals, and it will ask why and how these manuscripts were made, and how they were used.

DR CHRISTOPHER DE HAMEL

Dr de Hamel has doctorates from both Oxford and Cambridge Universities and has written over 100 books and articles on mediaeval manuscripts which have been translated into numerous languages. He was responsible for all catalogue and sales of illuminated manuscripts at Sotheby’s for twenty five years and is probably the best known expert on medieval manuscripts in the world.


20 JUNE 2018
THE PRESIDENTIAL LECTURE: JAMES LOMAX

THOMAS CHIPPENDALE: MASTER CRAFTSMAN AND ENTREPRENEUR – A TERCENTENARY LECTURE
The lecture will explore the life and work of Thomas Chippendale (1718–1779), Britain’s most celebrated furniture maker and designer. We chart his emergence from the vernacular traditions of Wharfedale to becoming the undisputed master of the metropolitan styles of fashionable London via his great book of designs, The Gentleman and Cabinet Maker’s Director. His genius for fine craftsmanship and elegant design, providing his clients with some of the most beautiful furniture ever made, did not prevent some financial near-disasters. The lecture coincides with the major Tercentenary exhibition at Leeds Museum, co-curated by the speaker.

James Lomax, M.A., A.M.A., F.S.A., is the retired Curator of Collections at Temple Newsam House. He was educated at Downside and Cambridge and trained at the Study Centre for the History of the Fine and Decorative Arts. He is interested in all aspects of fine and decorative arts and has written extensively and curated many exhibitions. His publications include A Victorian Chatelaine: Emily Ingram of Temple Newsam and Treasures of the English Church (Goldsmiths Hall, 2008). He is former Honorary Editor of the Furniture History Society, former Chairman of the Silver Society and is Honorary Curator of the Chippendale Society. Most importantly James is President of The Arts Society Leeds.


19 SEPTEMBER 2018

JAPONISM TO MODERNISM: HOW JAPANESE STYLE CHANGED WESTERN ART

The term Japonism was coined for all types of work created with a Japanese theme, from paintings and prints to furniture, interiors, architecture and gardens. This formed the basis for the design movement Modernism that was to shape our world in the 20th and 21st centuries . Japanese style was here to stay and brought about a new form of British and European design aesthetic.

SUZANNE PERRIN
Suzanne is a visiting lecturer at the Universities of Brighton Art and Cape Town, South Africa. She teaches on the Asian Art courses at the British Museum and the V&A and she founded Japan interlink in 1995 to promote the understanding of Japan in education and culture. Sarah has studied in Japan and has led tours there and in other parts of the world.


17 OCTOBER 2018

ANTHONY HAYWORTH

LIVING WITH HISTORY
A richly illustrated talk, tracing the development of the residential interior from the 17th to the 21st century and examining ways in which historical spaces may be re-interpreted to accommodate contemporary living. An inspirational selection of interiors is presented as stylish and successful examples of this approach to interior design.

Anthony holds a Master of Design Degree from the Royal College of Art and has over 30 years of international experience in interior design education and decorative arts management. He is an accredited NADFAS lecturer, Freeman of the City of London , Liveryman of the Worshipful Company of Furniture Makers, a Member of the British Institute of Interior Design, a Member of the European Academy of Design and an Education Committee Member of the Society of Garden Design.


21 NOVEMBER 2018
SARAH SEARIGHT

LUSTREWARE – FROM THE MIDDLE EAST TO WILLIAM DE MORGAN
This lecture will explain the miraculous aesthetic and technological ceramic miracle from its origin in19th century Iraq through Egypt and Syria, across the Mediterranean to Southern Spain / Andalusia and to Italy. The technique is revived in 19th-century Europe and in Britain with the superb creations of William de Morgan.

Sarah read modern history at Oxford University and worked as a historian and journalist specialising in the Middle East and more recently in the Islamic world including leading special tours to the region.

 

20 FEBRUARY 2019
250 YEARS OF THE ROYAL ACADEMY

ROSALIND WHYTE
In 2018 The Royal Academy of Arts celebrated its 250th anniversary, so it is an opportune time to explore its history and the role it has played in the development of British art. We will look at the position of artists in London before and after the formation of the Academy in 1768 and some of the characters involved, from the first President, Sir Joshua Reynolds, and other establishment figures, to artists who have taken a more oppositional stance, whether individually, such as Reynolds’ great contemporary and rival Gainsborough, or as a group, such as the (initially) clandestine Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, a group of young rebel artists who sought to subvert the Academy from within. Like any important institution, the Academy has been embroiled in intrigue and controversy over the course of its history and no scandal or outrage will remain unexposed as we trace the history of one of Britain’s most important cultural bodies, from its inception to the present day.

Rosalind holds a BA and an MA from Goldsmith’s College, and an MA with distinction from Birkbeck College London. Rosalind is now an experienced guide at Tate Britain, Tate Modern, the Royal Academy and Greenwich. She lectures at Tate, Dulwich Picture Gallery, to independent art societies and on cruises. She leads art appreciation holidays.


20 MARCH 2019
CONTRASTS OF COLOUR AND FORM: ART DECO JEWELLERY

SUSAN RUMFITT
This lecture explores the design and craftsmanship of jewellery created and worn during the Art Deco period

Susan is an independent jewellery advisor, auction consultant and lecturer. She studied for a postgraduate degree at Glasgow University. She was an international jewellery specialist at Phillips Auctioneers from 1996 and then Head of Department 1999-2002. She has lectured extensively for ladies’ luncheon clubs, antiques and collectors’ groups and is a specialist on the BBC’s Antiques Roadshow.

 

17 APRIL 2019

TAILORING THE IMAGE: CLOTHES AND ACCESSORIES IN ART

DR LOIS OLIVER

Clothing and accessories play a highly significant role in many works of art. For artists, luxury fabrics, fine lace, embroidery and jewellery have provided a showcase for their virtuosity, while also conveying fascinating messages about the figures depicted, their aspirations and relationships. Based on the latest research, this lecture explores the significance of everything from armour to silk slippers in masterpieces from the National Gallery collection. Ranging from 1500 to 1900, it features outstanding works by such masters as Bellini, Moroni, Hals, Van Dyck, Gainsborough, Ingres and Renoir. The lecture is illustrated with stunning close-up details from the paintings themselves and surviving historic costumes.

Dr Lois Oliver studied English Literature at Cambridge University, and History of Art at the Courtauld Institute, completing an MA in Venetian Renaissance Art and writing her doctoral thesis on The Image of the Artist, Paris 1815-1855. She worked at the Harvard University Art Museums before joining the curatorial team at the V&A and then the National Gallery, where she co-curated the major exhibition Rebels and Martyrs: the image of the artist in the nineteenth century (2006) and a series of touring exhibitions. Currently Assistant Professor in History of Art at the University of Notre Dame in London, and a Visiting Lecturer at the Courtauld Institute, she writes audio and multimedia tours for clients including the National Gallery, National Maritime Museum, Royal Academy and Tate, and has appeared on TV programmes for the BBC and Channel 5, as well as broadcasting on BBC Radio 3 and Radio 4.